Electric Separation – Hydrogen and Oxygen Up Close!

December 12, 2013
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Thinking about potassium, we’re sure.

Starting in 1807, Sir Humphry Davy used electrolysis to discover a myriad of elements. He used this process to uncover what we now take for granted as potassium, sodium, barium, calcium, chlorine, and magnesium among others.

The process Davy’s used has largely remained unchanged and can be followed by you and your students using the following Electrolysis Apparatus Unit (N99-B-2637-040) found at NADA Scientific.

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The electrolysis apparatus is used to demonstrate experiments in electrical charge/discharge and energy conversion. It features a main unit made of AS resin with fixed stainless steel electrodes, graduated test tubes (2), and a resin test tube holder. The compact design makes these units stackable for neat and easy storage. 

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If you’re looking for a suitable power source, it can also be purchased with the GENECON12  as a set to create the entire lab experience of separating water into its component gases.

Come check out NADA Scientific sell hundreds of educational items ranging from small toys to heavy duty equipment. For over 25 years, we have supplied a range of products to meet the demands of the dynamic educational environment. Our family of catalogs includes Science Education, Automotive Education, HD Instruments, Genecon, Nakamura, Science Gifts, and the Savings Center.

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Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) – Banned!

December 10, 2013

ImageWe know an engine can perform much more efficiently if it doesn’t need to accelerate and decelerate while switching gears. This is the purpose of the Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) and is the reason it was banned from Formula One racing in 1994.  It’s operation is so smooth and effortless it was thought to take the sport out of that racing pastime.

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However, CVT’s are still used in tractors, snowmobiles, motorcycles, go-karts, Formula 500 cars, and a host of other transportation vehicles and machines.

The uses for a CVT listed above can be easily examined and seen from the inside out using the ND11068Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) Gearbox Cut-Away from NADA Scientific.  It allows you to engage the CVT through an electromagnetic clutch, forward and reverse insertion lever, primary pulley, secondary pulley, roller belt, final reduction unit, and a hydraulic command unit.  It’s mounted on a stand with wheels and is operated manually by hand crank to allow you to determine the speed and monitor safety.

Click Here to check out the COMPLETE SPECS and to look around the site a bit more.


Give Thanks for Direct Current!

November 27, 2013

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It’s been just over 131 years since Thomas Edison’s Edison Electric Illuminating Company established the world’s first investor-owned electric utility station on Pearl Street in New York City.  On September 4, 1882, the Edison Illuminating Company switched on power to 59 customers in lower Manhattan, providing them with 110 volts of direct current (DC)!

Whether you’re a member of Team Edison or Team Tesla, we think both would agree that the GENECON12 is a fascinating tool to communicate the basics of how direct current works.

ImageWhile it won’t power homes in your neighborhood, it will provide 12 volts of hand powered direct current with changing polarity depending on the direction you turn it.  The GENECON12 produces approximately 200mA of usable current and when connecting one GENECON to another or to a low power source, it will act as a motor.  That’s only one of 22 experimental uses!

Click on either of the pictures to learn more about the GENECON12 as well as other products from NADA Scientific. Receive a complimentary Adventures with the GENECON Activities Book ($10 Value) with your purchase of 1 or more GENECONS.


Online Science Education Resources

January 28, 2010

On this blog I have previous written about integrating music and science education, multimedia in automotive education, and science comics and the classroom. Today I am going to concentrate on something you most likely are already doing if you read this blog: using tools from the Internet in your classroom. I will introduce you to a couple of great free resources to supplement and expand on your classroom lessons.

Today Science announced the first of 12 winners in websites that provide tools, information for and promotion of science education. This prize, which will be announced each month, is called SPORE, or The Science Prize for Online Resources in Education.

The first winner selected was The University of Utah Genetic Science Learning Center websites, one of these websites is for students. It provides virtual labs, informative graphics and detailed explanations, all in a lick user-friendly design. In addition, they also have a site specifically designed for science teachers. There you will find supplemental materials as well as print-and-go lesson plans.

Another great resource I would recommend is this online database of the 100 best free online science documentaries. With listings broken down into discipline, this is a fantastic way to find a supplement to your lessons.

What about you? What are your favorite science resources on the web?


Wooing Potential Scientists

November 30, 2009

Yesterday Britain’s Royal Society announced that they were putting 60+ historical scientific papers free on the internet in celebration of their 350th anniversary of promoting science. These papers include Benjamin Franklin’s descriptions of flying the famous silk kite and James Cook’s feeding his crew sauerkraut to keep them from getting scurvy. Students will be able to read and see these accounts in the writers’ handwriting right in front of them on their computer screen, bridging the past and future. The papers can be found here at trailblazing.royalsociety.org.

Why did they decide to do this? The Royal Society is dedicating to raising the profile of science. For Americans, this ties in with President Obama’s announcement last week that he was launching the “Educate to Innovate” Campaign for Excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (Stem) Education. This is a nationwide effort to get students studying science, and beyond that, into science related jobs.

Both of these initiatives are aimed at getting young people more engaged in science. Which do you think will be more successful? Do you think either of them will help?


Teaching Hybrid Technology

October 29, 2009

In this year’s Consumer Report annual reliability survey, five of the top eight family vehicles were hybrids. At the 2009 Tokyo Motor Show earlier this moth, the new Toyota Prius was voted Japan’s Car of the Year. The Honda Insight was awarded Car of the Year by the Committee of Japan Automotive Hall of Fame.

All signs point to the fact that not only are hybrids popular among environmentalists, they are popular among the general public as well as automotive insiders. This means that the market segment of hybrid owners will continue to grow.

And those cars will need to be maintained.

At this point, auto tech programs that teach or specialize in hybrid technology are rare. There are thousands of programs that still have yet to develop a curriculum for teaching hybrids. Part of the reason for that lag has been the lack of available teaching tools.

NADA Scientific is here to help. We recently introduced two new hybrid automotive technology teaching aids.

The Hybrid System Model is a solid model of a parallel hybrid system that is used in the Toyota Prius. It has a built-in operating panel to help students learn about hybrid engines.

The Hybrid Cut-Away Engine is an engine mounted on a metal frame that includes cut-aways of the engine and transmission sections, as well as an operation panel, all powered by two sets of 120V electric motors.


The Number of New Scientists

October 29, 2009

According to a new study, the number of native-born Americans studying Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) has stayed level over the past 30 years. These findings appear to be at odds with the public calls from the government and policy groups for more Americans to study science and engineering.

The paper was written by researchers at Rutgers University and Georgetown University. They conducted a longitudinal study, following students studying STEM through high school, college and into the workforce. They were looking for three things: the retention rate (how many students stayed in a STEM field), how this rate compared to previous generations, and the quality of the students who stayed with STEM studied.

What they found was a drop not in the overall numbers, but a drop in the final aspect, the quality. There was a sharp decline in the number of the highest performing students who continued to study STEM and join the workforce in an STEM related field. This decline began in the late 1990s.

This occurs because of the depressing wages in STEM fields, turning potential scientists and technology innovators into business people and office workers.

So is the public cry for more scientists beneficial? More scientists could cause a glut in the supply while driving down the quality.

Or instead, should we be more encouraging to those students who love science, and make sure there are more jobs available to them for wages commiserate with their importance.